#55: Excape (Exmouth) – E=MC Scared!

The theming in E=MC Scared! was done to a decent standard, but the puzzles were unsatisfying. I feel the creators, while enthusiastic, could have done with some more beta testing before opening to get the experience pinned down better. Playable, but unfortunately I can’t recommend it for enthusiasts.

Rating:★★ (Not recommended)
Location:Exmouth
Team:Family of 5
Date:28 December 2019
Hints taken:2
Time:Failed!
URL:Excape

Front & Briefing

Occupying some office space above a bank in Exmouth town centre, Excape is easy to find and after being buzzed in we went up a flight of steps to their floor. Both their current rooms are attached to a small mostly undecorated lobby, and while the rooms aren’t heated, our host did offer us a hot chocolate to get us warmed up.

The GM gave us a quick run-down of the story: we are schoolchildren trapped by “Professor von Doomington” and we need to escape before he gets back in 60 minutes. Everyone is also given a school tie and cap to wear, which is a little gimmicky for my taste but I could see other teams enjoying it.

Theme

As the title of the game suggests, this is tongue-in-cheek/twee horror, with a school science lab overtone. The storyline immediately falls apart as it appears that we need to break into the place rather than escape it, but it was functional and the game was fitted out to a good standard.

Puzzles

Aside from a couple of inventive physical puzzles the game was a let down in terms of both puzzle conception and execution. There were red herrings all over the place; one puzzle in particular was a case of trying nearly everything in the room in turn. I had deliberately overlooked one part because I knew I would be irritated if it was what I suspected, and it turned out to be so when we got a hint for it. “A classic escape room puzzle!” exclaimed the GM when someone mentioned it in the debrief.

This seemed to be a trend: the game relied on all-too-common tropes; for instance another puzzle basically required you to have encountered the same sort of thing done more logically elsewhere in order to know what to do; there was absolutely no hint I noticed to signpost it.

We also had what I would say was a technical failure due to doing two things in the wrong order that required me to apply my knowledge as a software developer to realise there was a problem and fix, and the GM didn’t seem to understand when I described the problem to him afterwards. I could go on; the game felt like irritation after irritation. There were also several unresolved padlocks by the end of the game which was rather unsatisfying.

Hint system

We’d been given a walkie-talkie during the briefing and checked it was working, but no other guidance as to how hints would be given. I hadn’t thought to ask in the briefing, but we had all assumed the GM would come on the radio every now and then if we were getting stuck. Eventually we realised during the game that this was probably wrong and asked for a hint. At a guess we were actually somewhat behind time by that point.

Finale

We ran out of time half-way through solving the final padlock, unfortunately! The room boasted a device that looked like it might have made for a fun success condition, but we didn’t get to see it. The GM did a good job at crafting a good ending for us nonetheless, which is always appreciated in the case of a failure.

While the team definitely wasn’t playing at their best for that room, I do feel that the technical issue we had and an earlier puzzle that could have done with having some maintenance, plus the other issues mentioned above, did cost us the couple of minutes we would have needed to get the last bit done.

Debriefing

The GM was happy to answer questions within the room after we’d finished, and took a team photo which was e-mailed to all the team members afterwards.

#51: Escape Quest (Zürich) – Magical Championship

Frustratingly, this could have been a four-star (highly recommended) room, but so many small things let it down, mostly around the puzzle design and game flow, that despite its good looks it’s difficult to recommend Magical Championship to experienced players.

Rating:★★☆☆☆ (Not recommended)
Location:Zürich
Team:Team of 3 in Zurich (R, Z & me)
Date:29 September 2019
Hints taken:3
Time:75m (failed!)
URL:Escape Quest

Front & Briefing

One street back from a well-served bus stop, Escape Quest is somewhat hidden behind a garage facade, where you’ll need to ring the bell to be led through a car park and up the stairs of the small office block it resides within. The briefing was fairly short and took place in the room itself. It’s certainly one of the more novel concepts I’ve experienced: the task was to discover which of four animal magicians had won a past magical tournament, using clues around the room, and a central playing board that felt a little reminiscent of the board game in Jumanji.

Theme

My first impression of walking into a dimly lit room was of disappointment – dim lighting often tends to get used to cover up a set design that’s been left wanting, or to artificially make puzzles harder. In this case, I think it was misplaced, because the artwork around the room was beautiful and I feel the creators should have celebrated it more.

As the game progressed, the quality did drop somewhat, with the final few puzzles feeling like we could have encountered them in any other escape room (as I often have!)

Puzzles

The puzzles started off fairly well in sync with the theme, but descended into more classic escape room fare pretty quickly. While the game wasn’t particularly linear, all the physical puzzle games got clumped together, as did the brainteasers, which meant that different members of the group weren’t able to play to their strengths in parallel.

That said, there were a couple of clever mechanisms, including a small incidental one that I haven’t seen before and was a clever use of the theming; it has brought a smile to my face just thinking of it.

Such mechanisms were unfortunately outnumbered by ones that, if they were signposted or hinted at by the room, we totally missed. We needed two hints alone just to work out what to do with a prop that really should have been obvious, and the actual solution didn’t feel satisfying. Having to work out how the central board game interacted with the rest of the room was also a problem at the beginning – it wasn’t clear what sort of solution we were trying to get from other puzzles in order to interact with it, which held up our ability to make logic leaps.

We had caught on that we were running behind time by the end of the room, which made the choice of the physical puzzles, which you can’t speed up by taking some extra hints, especially frustrating for me.

Hint system

Hints were by request only, via a wall intercom here. When we did ask for hints the GM didn’t seem to have been following what we’d done so far, and having to explain what we were having trouble with and what we’d tried so far was a little irritating.

Almost uniquely there was no countdown timer of any sort in the room. I can’t blame our going over time on this (one team member had a watch, and we incorrectly assumed we could see where the game was heading towards a finale, which it wasn’t), but it was an odd omission.

To the venue’s credit, they allowed us to go over time, which they say they will try to let teams do if there isn’t another team booked into the following slot.

Finale

The game had a natural finish, but nothing I would particularly call a finale here. In fact it wasn’t even immediately obvious what we were supposed to do when we finished the game’s main objective (wait for the GM to greet us, mostly).

Debriefing

Quite a functional debriefing; we were over time so this may have affected things, but it was a photo (using our own camera) of us with a couple of props, then payment, then we were lead back out the building by the GM.

#50: Escape Rooms (London) – Pharaoh’s Chamber

Unfortunately, Pharoah’s Chamber wasn’t much more than some reasonably interesting puzzle loosely tied together with a vague theme. For a central London location, this made it all the more disappointing.

Rating:★★☆☆☆ (Not recommended)
Location:London
Team:Rhubarb Rhubarb
Date:8 September 2019
Hints taken:0, or 3, depending on who’s counting
Time:55m48s
URL:Escape Rooms

Front & Briefing

A couple of minutes’ walk from London Bridge station must make this the most central location I’ve been to a escape room in, and the venue was naturally pretty easy to find, just tucked away down a side street off the main road. We were welcomed inside and given the basic info jointly with another group doing a different room. Our GM then lead us to the room and gave us some more room-specific details before setting the timer on the wall and leaving us to it.

Theme

The title of the room implied a fair amount about what we might expect of the content, though upon entering I found myself a little disappointed at the sparsity of the area, especially given the marketing material on Escape Rooms’ website. There were some Ancient Egyptian props, most obviously the ones spaced around the exterior, but apart from that it was largely a white room with some thematic cues rather than feeling like you were truly raiding a tomb as per the room’s description.

Puzzles

Similarly, by and large the puzzles felt like they could have been transplanted into any space, and some were out-and-out anachronistic. One of the trickier puzzles, which required some intuiting over how a system worked, was made even harder by an instruction given to us during the briefing, which, at a guess, had been added to the briefing to make the first stage of the puzzle less bewildering for escape room beginners, but it actively prevented us from finding required information later – we required a not-a-hint (see below) in order to solve it.

One other puzzle stood out as a massive missed opportunity to engage all the members of the team more, and as it stood there really wasn’t much teamwork involved at all in the whole game; certainly not at a physical level.

Hint system

Escape Rooms (that is, the company running this venue) has a different notion of what counts as a hint to most other places I’ve been to. The GM is happy to talk to you and provide what I myself would call hints or clues in any other game, without it technically counting as a hint. (And they did so with quite a high frequency!)

This mattered a bit for this venue as no-hint winners got a team photo on a special wall of fame in the foyer. We didn’t take any official hints, but I would imagine they are pretty much just telling you the answer based on the non-hint information we received.

Finale

The game ends when the last of a few possible puzzles were completed. This reminded me of Cathedral (#42), where inevitably the puzzle that has been most aggregating ends up being your last, which I’m not convinced is good game design. As with Cathedral, it also meant that one team member had started the puzzle and didn’t really need input from the others mid way through.

Debriefing

As one of the team put it afterwards, this was actually the most fun bit of the room! As winners we were given a black sheet of paper on which to affix a team photo, and some glittery pens to decorate the border with. This is then put up in the hall of fame in the foyer.

#44: Red House Mysteries (Exeter) – The Shadow Darkens

While there was nothing wrong with The Shadow Darkens, there wasn’t a lot about it that stood out either. Compared to Red House Mysteries’ current other game The Heist (#26), it felt a bit of a let-down.

Rating:★★☆☆☆ (Not recommended)
Location:Exeter
Team:Rhubarb Rhubarb
Date:9 April 2019
Hints taken:0
Time:44 minutes
URL:Red House Mysteries

Front & Briefing

We had a different GM than our last visit, who was enjoying some music on a record player I hadn’t noticed the first time around. The briefing was the usual; the mission to find various bits of “evidence” in protagonist detective Jack Armstrong’s office in order to prove him innocent after a wrongful arrest.

Theme

The room is set in the 1940s and Red House Mysteries have sourced materials and props that looked right to my untrained eye. Some of the items in the room were starting to look a little worn, though given that this was supposed to be a working office, this didn’t detract too much. I’m not sure if this is a problem or not, but the choice of background music in the room was extremely relaxing and it took some willpower to ramp up and start searching the room!

Puzzles

A nice set of mostly mechanical puzzles with a couple of slightly higher tech things thrown in later. Not too many padlocks but also nothing particularly astounding here. One interesting aspect was the “evidence” which had to be collected in a certain way; this didn’t particularly work for me but the other two players on my team seemed to understand it. Given how it was presented, I didn’t feel like it logically proved Armstrong innocent and required a bit too large a logic leap for me.

Hint system

Integrated nicely into the room. The only time it was used for us was, unfortunately, for the final puzzle, where the GM had to double-check we’d done the correct thing and then notify us of an equipment failure.

Finale

The finale was an interesting concept in that you could do it as you go along, or leave it all to the end if you wanted to. As I’ve mentioned above, I didn’t personally find it particularly exciting, and we had a technical problem with it.

Debriefing

A nice chat with the GM afterwards, who took our photo for Facebook and Instagram with the same props as for the Heist. We also found out that they have another room in the works, though unfortunately they’re replacing The Heist rather than this one, which was a surprise since I felt The Heist was a much better room.

#42: Mystique Room (Budapest) – The Cathedral

A pretty basic escape room, with some theming that was “good enough” but puzzles that were generally not very exciting.

Rating: ★★☆☆☆ (Not recommended)
Location:Budapest
Team:Rhubarb Rhubarb
Date:26 March 2019
Hints taken:2
Time:52m
URL:Mystique Room

Front & Briefing

Back in Mystique Room’s main building after finishing their newer room Pirate Bay (#41) and with another story recited that, like Mystique’s lesser offerings, bore little relevance to the actual room (in short: collect the artefacts), we were shown into the room, a medieval-themed room based about the notion of a medieval cathedral.

Theme

The old basement of the Mystique Room property lent itself well to this theme, and some parts were simply uncovered wall. There were props and decorations you might expect from the theme, and not a lot in the way of major set pieces; certainly nothing with any kind of wow factor. Breaking immersion was a lot of padlocks, though other puzzles used more authentic-seeming devices, and there was some electronic tech behind the scenes in a couple of places.

Puzzles

Very little out of the ordinary, including one game that is seriously overused in escape rooms (in fact, Mystique Room’s own Tower of Wollongong (#37) contained one of these puzzles in it; as I mentioned for Pirate Bay (#41), it’s very disappointing when one venue recycles puzzles). Finding the combos for the padlocks was fairly run of the mill too, though there were a couple of more interesting puzzles based around this. One of the more high tech puzzles required a bit too much of a logic leap and we had to take two clues before we understood what to do and what that had done; as far as I could tell there was no signposting for it at all.

Hint system

Walkie-talkie with the GM. Unlike some of Mystique Room’s games, this one did have a countdown timer on display.

Finale

As with most collect-the-artefacts games, there was an element of non-linearity to it, and what ends up being your final puzzle depends on which puzzle you finished last. Inevitably we finished the most tiresome one last, and it was one where the last team member (of three) was just sat down waiting for the other two, so probably the least exciting finish I remember in an escape game recently.

Debriefing

As with the other games, the GM met us and there were some costumes to wear for a group photo, which the GM took using one of our own cameras.

Final thoughts

It’s interesting to see the earlier games from a venue that also has some good ones on offer (see Pirate Bay (#41) and Time Machine (#38)), and finding out where their initial strengths were and how they’ve learned from what didn’t work in the earlier rooms such as this one. Unfortunately, that doesn’t change the fact that this was a pretty basic escape room.

#32: Mystery Games (Budapest) – Secret of the Depth

While it had the edge on Mystery Games’ other offering, Alchemist’s Gold (#31), and was definitely more fun, the steampunk submarine of Secret of the Depth still had some major flaws which makes it difficult to recommend.

Rating: ★★☆☆☆
Location:Budapest
Team:Rhubarb Rhubarb
Date:24 March 2019
Hints taken:2
Time:45m50
URL:Mystery Games

Front & Briefing

Immediately following Alchemist’s Gold (#31), we sat in the foyer waiting for our GM to re-appear and lead us into Secret of the Depth.

Theme

The aim of the game is to get a missile into its missile tube in able to launch it at an enemy ship. There were obviously various obstacles in the way of doing so.

The steampunk element was executed generally well, with some nice puzzle props and a high attention to detail on the set. However, in terms of immersion the game quite often let us down; one code was something we’d been told in the briefing but the room seemed to be expecting us to figure out on our own, and the absurdity of the number of obstacles between the missile and its final location, along with the location itself, got in the way. There were also some modern electronics in places that we originally thought were not part of the game because they stuck out so much, but indeed were there to be used. Finally, a large prop in one area that we expected to be used never was.

Puzzles

Some interesting puzzles, though quite a lot of four-character sequences. One of the nicer-looking puzzles had a mechanical failure, and it took a bit of persuasion to convince the GM that we weren’t just doing it wrong, at which point they had to direct us to a workaround. While sinning less than Alchemist’s Gold, there was at least one classic escape room game barely dressed up enough for the theme, with lighting dark enough to make it a real nuisance.

Hint system

Direct communication with the GM via a walkie-talkie. Hints on request.

Finale

Given the briefing and the theme, we expected a better finale than what we got, and indeed actually “escaping” (which, again, seemed like an unnecessary bolted on idea given the theme of the room) managed to break immersion for me too.

Debriefing

Again, the GM was very hands-off here. We paid up and decided to take a photo ourselves in lieu of any offering from the GM – and I’m pretty sure there were no other games ongoing this time around that were occupying her. She did at least take a photo of us on our own camera when we asked.

Final thoughts

It’s at the high end of a 2-star rating for this one purely on the effort put into the set, but ultimately it’s a room I just wouldn’t particularly recommend to people.

One other feature of the venue, which made me feel a little uncomfortable, was the fish tank in the reception and in the room itself; I’m not sure a loud clanky environment is the right place to be keeping pets in, though I haven’t accounted for this in the room’s rating.

#31: Mystery Games (Budapest) – Alchemist’s Gold

Essentially a basic escape room with some set dressing, Alchemist’s Gold didn’t feel like it brought anything new to us and while it might appeal to first-timers, it relied on many mechanisms that would feel old and tired to any experienced player.

Rating: ★★☆☆☆
Location:Budapest
Team:Rhubarb Rhubarb
Date:24 March 2019
Hints taken:3
Time:Between 50 and 60m
URL:Mystery Games

Front & Briefing

The foyer at Mystery Games was well decorated in a theme that suited both the games we played (Alchemist’s Gold and, mostly, Secret of the Depth (#32)).

We followed the GM into the room, the corner of which had a suitable place to stow bags, and were given the rough story: find several artefacts and get out of the (very physically) locked room.

Theme

The puzzles often strayed from the theme, unless the eponymous alchemist happened to have a penchant for classic escape room games, and aside from some decoration the puzzles could have been found in any unthemed room. One commonly-encountered battery-powered device totally broke immersion – it would be so easy to turn it into a magician’s prop that it irked me that this hadn’t been done, and the battery was running low enough to turn using it into a chore. What would have been the nicest reveal was spoiled by the fact that we had to take a hint in order to activate it; arguably a search fail but I would wonder how many teams actually manage to stumble upon it without a clue. Quite a lot of padlocks.

Puzzles

The puzzles often strayed from the theme, unless the eponymous alchemist happened to have a penchant for classic escape room games, and aside from the set theming the puzzles could have been pulled from any unthemed room. One commonly-found battery-powered device totally broke immersion – it would be so easy to turn it into a magician’s prop that it irked me that this hadn’t been done, and the battery was running low enough to turn using it into a chore. What would have been the nicest reveal was spoiled by the fact that we had to take a hint in order to activate it; arguably a search fail but I would wonder how many teams stumbled upon it without a clue. Quite a lot of padlocks.

Hint system

Walkie-talkies, with hints on request. Our hints were all search fails of sorts, and the GM directed us straight to the item, which seemed reasonable given that we’d scoured the place pretty thoroughly each time before asking.

The countdown clock wasn’t something I’d seen before and was one of the things that had been fit into the theme of the room. It was quite a vague indication of the time, meaning that we didn’t know exactly how much time was left by the end of the game, and our GM wasn’t forthcoming afterwards (see below).

Debriefing

Surprisingly we weren’t actually greeted by the GM upon exiting the game. I hadn’t realised before now how much this adds to the ending of a game – the GM is supposed to be ostensibly on your side against the room, and it rather felt like we’d been abandoned. I think this is because the GM was still advising the team playing another room. We sat in the foyer and waited for our next game to be ready.

#25: Time Run – Sherlock: The Game is Now

(Editor’s note 2019-04-24: I have revised this down from the original 3-stars to 2-stars after further consideration. The bottom line is that I don’t recommend The Game is Now given the price, expectations from Time Run, and the experience evaluated as an escape room rather than a Sherlock amusement.)

Rating:★★☆☆☆ (Not recommended)
Location:London
Team:Rhubarb Rhubarb Rhubarb
Date:10 February 2019
Hints taken:Many
Time:56 minutes
URL:The Game is Now

Front & Briefing

Masquerading as an extremely convincing opticians within a shopping centre (though the surrounding Sherlock-themed walls rather give it away), The Game is Now starts with you buzzing in for your team’s “group eye examination”. While there are no toilets before the game, there are some available afterwards, and Time Run also note that there are toilets right across from the opticians in the shopping centre – though not, as we found out, before our slot at 10:15am on Sunday, so you might want to keep this in mind when choosing a time.

There was one other group here for their eye test at the same time as us, and after signing the expected waivers we were lead to our group’s individual “eye test room” to be briefed. We did see the other group again, which unnerved me a little as I wasn’t expecting cross-team interaction; fortunately this was just a matter of saving floor space and the two teams went their separate ways afterwards. Mentioning much more starts to move into spoiler territory in my mind, especially for Sherlock fans, but needless to say there are appearances by recognisable faces during the lead-in and during the game. As we now expect from Time Run (see Lance of Longinus (#5) and The Celestial Chain (#7)), the staff and GMs were also fully in character the whole time.

Theme

Naturally the theme was based around the BBC’s Sherlock series, though this started to become somewhat more abstract as the experience progressed. The sets, as you would expect from Time Run, were of a high quality, particularly in the first section. There was a Sherlock storyline to the experience, but it was extremely loose and honestly a bit confusing – and not in the usual Steven Moffat way, more that it just didn’t hang together or particularly relate to what we were doing; it felt shoehorned in despite a sizeable amount of the preamble to the room being occupied with it. As with all the Time Run series, the game is serialised into areas to increase throughput, which worked fine in their previous two games but here felt like we were basically playing a series of mini-rooms.

Puzzles

Also surprisingly for Time Run was that a lot of the puzzles had a large reliance on finding codes or getting the next key as a reward for solving a puzzle; there were no grand interactive set pieces like in Lance of Longinus and Celestial Chain. I wonder if this was some restriction imposed by some outside force; with the exception of decoration the actual interactive parts of the experience were very focused on almost free-standing props that could have been put into any space of an appropriate size, rather than really using the space of the room creatively.

The puzzles themselves were fairly standard fare for escape rooms these days, with some reasonably high tech ways of presenting puzzles that were not especially logic based; more trial-and-error as far as we could tell. There were also not a lot of parallel threads going on; one section was very linear, and another was a bit of a shopping list.

Hint system

Mostly text on a screen, some of which was presented as being from Sherlock Holmes – this worked fine and I imagine Sherlock fans would enjoy being snarkily talked down to by The Face of Cumberbatch.

Whereas in a lot of escape room there is some question or opportunity for the GM to gauge a team’s experience or ask about quantity of hints, there wasn’t here (unless the eye examination room section counted, but it felt more like filler), especially since we were handed between staff quite a lot and weren’t exactly sure who our GM would be in order to discuss it with them – in fact I’m still not sure if we ever met our hint-writer, who seemed extremely trigger-happy on the hint system. We were getting hints come through before we’d even had a chance to properly examine some puzzles, which rather took the fun out of solving them. We finished with four minutes to spare so there was definitely time for us to have a bit more of a fiddle before jumping in, and at any rate it felt like we were being guided rather than actually given a chance to figure something out.

Finale

None to speak of! Without a visual countdown we didn’t have much of a sense of how close we were to the end, and what turned out to be the final puzzle, while involving three of the team – the most any puzzle had so far – didn’t have the feel of a final event to us. The escape room therefore finished quite abruptly, with a short video wrapping up what storyline there had been, and we were lead out into the debriefing room.

Debriefing

While the hints and commentary from Sherlock and Mycroft before and during the game had been quite disparaging (this is in character for them, so that’s not a complaint) the actor debriefing us (another person we hadn’t met before and who had been given notes from our unseen GM) was very upbeat.

We’d been categorised under a certain label like with Celestial Chain, though it wasn’t really obvious why this was necessary here. The process seemed to be there to reassure us that we’d done okay, which makes me think the excess of hints we’d received had been designed into the game too.

The box with our belongings had been moved here and after leaving the debriefing area there was, oddly, a bar reserved solely for finished players, serving drinks (and providing a surprising number of toilets). I imagine Time Run are expecting a lot of people to be using it because it was huge, but we were only people there until the other team that had started at the same time as us emerged a few minutes after us.

Final thoughts

I didn’t like having to write this review and perhaps I have been overly harsh in places compared to some other rooms, but I think expectations matter and we did expect a higher standard of room, both given that Time Run have put their name to it, and for the price as probably the most expensive escape room I’ve done. The target audience may be different from the average escape room – it is definitely more of a “Sherlock Experience” than an experienced escape room player’s room – and I’m sorry to say I can’t recommend it.

#23: Devon Escape – Death on Dartmoor

★★☆☆☆

LocationNewton Abbott
TeamRhubarb Rhubarb
Date26 Aug 2018
Hints takenMany
Time62m40s out of 63m
URLDevon Escape

Front & Briefing

See #21. The room was introduced via a fictional news article coming in over the radio, and you might want to pay attention to it for later. The rough story was to solve who had committed a crime that took place on Dartmoor where the room is set.

Theme

Pretty good with an impressive prop/feature that the GM mentioned afterwards was the only escape room they know of where this had been done. It certainly caught our attention as we entered! It’s not a spoiler to say there are more than one area you’ll be operating in, and the section set “outside” wasn’t entirely convincing, but it was fine for a mid-range budget game. We did however have a game malfunction which lead to us fumbling around in the dark for the majority of the game when we hadn’t needed to. I feel this should have been very obvious to the GM watching us on the camera and we had to take hints and even solutions for puzzles that we were doing the right thing for but just couldn’t see! We even discussed out loud that it was just too dark. Malfunctions happen (see for instance #12) but a GM should be able to identify them and intervene to fix them.

Puzzles

Fairly average, unfortunately, with a strong focus on irritatingly forensic searching, which is where we took a couple of hints just to find things in places we had absolutely already looked and would have expected to have seen the clue (in areas not affected the aforementioned malfunction, too). Similarly to their other room (see #21) there was an immersion-breaking optional puzzle, though in this room they did a better job at dressing it up with the theme.

Finale

Quite a nice way of tying a few threads together, and a nice way of identifying the suspect we had to report in on.

Debriefing

The GM did apologise for missing the malfunction while we were running through the game afterwards in the space itself.

Final thoughts

While the room had an impressive prop to greet you as you went in, the puzzles and our particular experience let the whole room down.

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